On August 2, Nova Scotia Power Inc. announced it would be installing 12 electric vehicle fast charging stations across the province. Seen here are (from left) Karen Hutt, President and CEO of Nova Scotia Power; Sanjeev Pushkarna, NSP Manager of Customer Solutions; and David Swan, electric vehicle owner.

HALIFAX: Nova Scotia Power Inc (NSPI) is looking to help drivers of electric cars charge their batteries, and the initiative could see charging stations spring up in the local area.

“Your specific region most definitely has a number of locations that meet our criteria, specifically if the location is in one kilometer of a 100-series highway,” said Sanjeev Pushkarna, Manger of Customer Solutions for NSPI. “We encourage everyone who meets the criteria to submit an application. We’d love to see one in your area assuming it’s a good fit.

“What we’re hoping for is potential site hosts to visit our website, look at the criteria, and if they do meet the criteria, then to reach out to our procurement team. They’ll be considered to become a host.

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“Once we get applications, we’ll make a decision based on the criteria that are laid out.”

On Wednesday of last week, the provincial utility announced it would be installing 12 electric vehicle fast charging stations across the province, as part of a pilot project to study the impact and usage of the network on the electrical system. The network will be ready for use in spring of 2018.

“Electric vehicles are the future, and we want to help make Nova Scotia ready for that future,” said Karen Hutt, President and CEO of Nova Scotia Power. “These charging stations will make it easier for Nova Scotians to own and drive an electric vehicle. And this project will help us understand how to make Nova Scotia more EV-friendly for customers, while managing any impact to the electrical grid.”

This new network will make it easier and more convenient for electric vehicle owners to drive with ease between Yarmouth and Sydney without worrying about running out of a battery charge. The average charge time for these types of chargers is 15 to 30 minutes, whereas most public chargers in Nova Scotia take 3-8 hours, and a regular outlet at your home can take 12 hours or more.

In a 2016 survey undertaken by Nova Scotia Power, one third of respondents said they would consider an electric vehicle as their next car, while 65 per cent said they would consider an electric vehicle if more charging stations were available.

The specific criteria for requests for proposals can be found online at www.nspower.ca/ev.

Please note the deadline for RFP submissions is August 16.